Coronavirus FAQ

At Country Properties We are committed to maintaining business as usual in order to aid our customers, suppliers and staff in this difficult period and you can continue to contact us by phone or email and our other online facilities. Before contacting us, if you have a question, please see below a list of key FAQs we've had over the past few weeks.

FAQs from sellers regarding COVID-19

I have exchanged contracts, why can’t I complete?
Normally if you have exchanged contracts, it guarantees you will complete the sale. However, the government guidance is to delay your move for now. Legal companies have been advised of how to do this so it’s done consistently.

However it is still possible to complete, IF you can move your own belongings within the government guidelines and keys can be transferred remotely or respecting the 2m distancing guidelines or don’t need to move into the property straightaway eg it’s for investment or a second home.

What does a ‘delay’ actually mean?
Basically, the contract can be ‘varied’. This will allow your existing contracts to still be valid, but with a flexible date to complete, however your agent and legal company should initially still check your buyer can complete (see: Will my mortgage still be valid?)

Will my mortgage still be valid?
It would be worth asking your legal company or contacting the mortgage lender/your broker yourself to ask how they are going to deal with your mortgage. In general, mortgage lenders have agreed to extend mortgages for three months. However if your job and earning status has changed, you will have to discuss if you can still go ahead, for example, if you have been furloughed or have lost your job or income has fallen due to the lock down.

For information on how to secure income during the lock down, visit: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-to-employers-and-businesses-about-covid-19

Can I insist we complete?
The government allows you ‘to move-house where reasonably necessary’ during this time. So you can ask to complete, but if someone in the chain has been formally asked to isolate for 12 weeks because they are vulnerable or people are self-isolating because they may or do have Coronavirus, you could be putting everyone’s lives at risk and this is not within government guidance. Bear in mind your buyer’s circumstances may have changed through no fault of their own. So, please, be understanding and kind.

Who insures a property during exchange and completion?
It is the responsibility of the buyer to insure the property during exchange and completion, but the seller’s lender will also require the seller to maintain the insurance until the mortgage is repaid. Talk to your legal and insurance companies if you are unsure how to proceed and if it is your buyer insuring the property, make sure you have their details just in case you need them in an emergency. 

If the property is going to be empty for over 30 days, you should check with the insurer whether it will still be covered or whether you will need specialist insurance.

What if my buyer pulls out?
People always get nervous when there is uncertainty, and these are extraordinary times. If you have exchanged and your buyer pulls out for a valid reason eg they have lost their job, lost their own buyer, their mortgage offer has been pulled, then under normal contract terms a seller would still be entitled to damages, however if you have varied the contract to defer completion because of Coronavirus, the clause will probably allow a buyer to withdraw for these reasons without penalty.  Check with your property lawyer.

If they wish to pull out because they are nervous of what might happen to property prices or committing, then unless the normal contract terms have been changed, you are entitled to a percentage of the deposit.

If you have not exchanged, your buyer can pull out at any time. Although your property can still be marketed online, unfortunately properties can’t be viewed during lock down, so talk to your agent about how they can remarket the property and secure interest and potential viewings, when the lock down is over.

Can I still exchange during lock down?
This will depend on whether a mortgage is required and if a valuation/survey has been done or not. If your buyer is a cash buyer and/or they have a mortgage, but the valuation/survey has already been done, you can exchange, but with a contract that will leave a date open to complete.

If the mortgage valuation has not been carried out but you and the lender are happy with a desktop valuation, then you may be able to complete.

If my sale is aborted, what costs will I incur?
If you have already exchanged, you may be able to claim the aborted costs from your buyer, depending on why they pulled out (see What if my buyer pulls out?). If you haven’t exchanged you are likely to incur small costs such as those which are finance related, but speak to your lender/broker, under the circumstances they may wave any fees incurred. If your legal company was booked on a ‘no sale, no fee’ basis, they you will be charged for any fees incurred on your behalf, but not the law firm’s charges for their legal work.  If your legal company is not on a ‘no sale, no fee’ basis then you will have to pay for their work to date.  This will vary depending on how long your transaction has been going and how much work they have done so do check with them.  As with lenders/brokers, talk to your legal company, they may be lenient during this time.

Even if you are on a ‘no sale, no fee’ basis, this does not apply once contracts are exchanged.

Why are some removal companies saying they won’t move me?
Removal companies are in a tricky position. They are being told they can carry out work for ‘critical moves’ as long as they meet the government guidelines. However, they cannot meet the 2m social distancing and will clearly be constantly touching your items, which even if they wear gloves, won’t protect it. They will also be in your old and new home and likely to be in contact with you.

One of the main trade bodies for removal companies is the British Association of Removers. They have advised their members not to move people. If a company does agree to move you, please note they cannot do this within the government guidelines, and you will be exposing yourself and your family to potential infection.

Do I need to clean a property before I move out or in?
Ideally yes, but this is something you need your legal company to agree with other parties. For example, confirm who is cleaning which property – should you clean the one you are leaving or clean the one you are moving to. Here are the government guidelines for cleaning a property: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-decontamination-in-non-healthcare-settings/covid-19-decontamination-in-non-healthcare-settings

 

FAQs from landlords regarding COVID-19

What can I do if my tenant leaves?  
Many landlords lost tenants when countries were locking down, be it students going home or people from abroad wanting to be back in their own country. Some tenants were good and discussed this with the landlord, agreeing on payment, while others disappeared without a word and not paid anything or at best suggested the landlord keeps the deposit. If they have returned abroad it is probably not worth pursuing.

From a student perspective, some corporate landlords eg at Nottingham and Sheffield, have already cancelled payments for the next term and private landlords would be wise to try and find a deal for students. Obviously this will be easier for some than others, but these are difficult times and everyone needs to find a way that both sides can live with. Remember, courts are currently closed, so it will be months and possibly take until 2021 for any action to take place.

Can I let a property during the lock down?
Firstly, viewings cannot take place as this is considered ‘non-essential’ during the lock down. However, government guidance is “to move house where reasonably necessary” in other words if viewings have already taken place and a contract already signed and added to this, the tenants/family would be homeless if the move doesn’t go ahead or they may be a key worker moving to help in the NHS, it is possible for the let to go ahead, but only if essential.

For shared homes, even if they are happy to rent the room without viewing it. Bringing a new tenant in can cause all sorts of problems. They may turn out to be badly behaved, bring visitors around, not abide by the government guidelines and put your other tenants at risk and you will struggle to evict them via the courts or any other method, bearing in mind the social distancing guidelines.

If keys are being handed over, then they need to be disinfected prior to doing so and it would be wise for the new tenant to do a deep clean on the property and ideally leave the property empty for 72 hours. Here is the government guidance on cleaning:- https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-decontamination-in-non-healthcare-settings/covid-19-decontamination-in-non-healthcare-settings

Right to rent checks
If someone does have to be moved in during lock down or beyond, right to rent checks have changed during Coronavirus:-

As of 30 March 2020:

Checks can now be carried out over video calls

Tenants can send scanned documents or a photo of documents for checks using email or a mobile app, rather than sending originals

Landlords should use the Landlord’s Checking Service if a prospective or existing tenant cannot provide any of the existing documents

For more information visit: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-landlord-right-to-rent-checks

What if my tenant doesn’t pay their rent?
There appear to be three types of tenants. Firstly, those that are continuing to pay their rent, then those who genuinely cant and have lost jobs, been furloughed etc and then there are those that are just trying to use this as an excuse not to pay.

The important thing is to talk to all your tenants and firstly advise them that there is help available to help them afford the rent – or as much as they can. This is where they need to look: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/support-for-those-affected-by-covid-19/support-for-those-affected-by-covid-19 As a landlord it is worth understanding which ones of these would apply to your tenant and if required, how to help them apply or suggest they speak to the local housing team who have access to further funds.

If your tenant still asks for a rent reduction, do your due diligence, so ask them for:-

Statutory sick note
Evidence of job loss
Evidence of fall in income

It is also important to agree with the tenant a payment plan to repay the lost rent if possible, unless you are happy and able to allow a discount during this period.

If you are having difficulties with tenants, contact Landlord Action for help, they are running a mediation service during this time.

Your Agent will be doing much of this on your behalf and will be in constant contact about this with you.

Can I apply for a ‘mortgage holiday’
Firstly, calling it a ‘mortgage holiday’ is a poor use of words, it’s a break. But all lenders have been asked to allow this to happen for homeowners and buy to let investors with mortgages. Some landlords have reported being ‘refused’ by lenders, this may be because the lenders haven’t had much time to put in place and explain to staff about the mortgage breaks available, so give them time and this should be sorted. Speak to them and advise them that the government has agreed with all lenders that this break is allowed.

BUT, please be aware you will not only still have to pay the mortgage money you have deferred back, but also any additional interest you owe. There are other ways you can reduce the money you owe, for example, move to interest only, pay what you can afford or add the months you defer on to the end of your mortgage. As interest rates have changed, this is a perfect time to talk to a broker to check any mortgage deal and then you can discuss the best way to secure some help over the coming months.

How do people self-isolate in a shared property? 
For people who are in shared homes, this is really difficult but we’ve seen some great examples of tenants drawing up rotas and advising other tenants via things like WhatsApp of when they have left the kitchen/bathroom etc. Many landlords have delivered cleaning equipment for tenants to stay safe.

If there is a tenant that is not ‘playing ball’ then it is worth sending a simple, polite letter or email advising tenants of their responsibilities, or a phone conversation. If that doesn’t work, then contact Landlord Action. Worse case you can start eviction procedures, but you won’t be able to start eviction procedures via the courts for three months.

Although this is written for tenants in Wales, apart from the key differences, there is lots of good information in here: https://gov.wales/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-for-tenants-in-the-private-rented-sector-html

Do I still supply a cleaner to a property?
Most landlords have stopped cleaners going into properties and supplied cleaning equipment for the tenants. If it is part of the service, some landlords have reduced the rent to reflect this.

What if I have issued an eviction notice?
If you have issued an eviction notice, unfortunately the courts have closed for the foreseeable future, even if you had issued it before the lock down, so it won’t be progressed for at least 90 days. These changes apply to “secure, assured, assured shorthold, introductory and demoted tenancies and tenancies under the Rents Act 1977, thereby covering most tenants in the private and social rented sectors.” Source: https://gov.wales/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-for-tenants-in-the-private-rented-sector-html

This is an extremely tough time for landlords who are having to evict tenants due to non-payment of rent or causing a nuisance to neighbours or other tenants as there is little you can do until the courts re-open, but try to negotiate with the tenant. If you have any rent guarantee insurance, then it may be worth making a claim.

As these are unusual times, with new and temporary laws applying, then I would suggest you use an expert eviction agency such as Landlord Action.

What if I want to issue an eviction notice?
In England and Wales, you can still send the paperwork to evict a tenant, but for “secure, assured, assured shorthold, introductory and demoted tenancies and tenancies under the Rents Act 1977, thereby covering most tenants in the private and social rented sectors.” Source: https://gov.wales/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-for-tenants-in-the-private-rented-sector-html you cannot start court proceedings until after three months (normally two).

If you are a live in landlord or tenants are on a license, you can still evict, but this goes against government guidelines of people moving only if absolutely necessary. The government guidance is:-

“We are urging the landlords of those on licences to occupy to follow the same guidance and to work with renters who may be facing hardship as a result of the response to COVID-19.” Source: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/876500/Consolidated_Landlord_and_Tenant_Guidance_COVID_and_the_PRS_v4.2.pdf

 

What about the regular property management visits/inspections?

The advice is to postpone in person inspections/management visits.  However we are where possible carrying out virtual visits with the Tenants on FaceTime or similar whilst they are at home.  Your Agent will be in touch with you about this.

Do I have to carry out safety checks during lock down?
According to the government guidance, during Coronavirus:-

 “Tenants have a right to a decent, warm and safe place to live - it is in the best interests of both tenants and landlords to ensure that properties are kept in good repair and free from hazards.”

 “It has never been more important that landlords and tenants take a pragmatic, common sense approach to resolving issues. Tenants should let their landlords know early if there is a problem and landlords should take the appropriate action.”

However:-
“This should mean that tenants who are living with serious hazards that a landlord has failed to remedy can still be assured of local authority support. Landlords should also know they should not be unfairly penalised where COVID-19 restrictions prevent them from meeting some routine obligations.”

As long as the certificates, repairs and maintenance can take place within the government guidelines they should do so. However, bear in mind that people are getting sick and this can reduce the number of tradespeople available. As a result, book the safety certificates you can as much in advance as possible.

Your Agent will be doing much of this on your behalf and will be in contact about this with you.

For further information on getting work done, visit: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/further-businesses-and-premises-to-close/further-businesses-and-premises-to-close-guidance#work-carried-out-in-peoples-homes

Beware! New electrical safety rules for privately rented properties

The new Electrical Safety Standards in the Private Rented Sector Regulations 2020 were made on 18th March and will apply to all new tenancies on 1st July 2020 and for existing tenancies on 1st April 2021.

The Electrical Safety Regulations will require landlords to:

• Have the electrical installations in their properties inspected and tested by a person who is qualified and competent, at least every five years;

• Provide a copy of the report (known as the Electrical Safety Condition Report or EICR) to their tenants, and to the local authority if requested.

• If the EICR requires investigative or remedial works, landlords will have to carry this out.

Source: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/876500/Consolidated_Landlord_and_Tenant_Guidance_COVID_and_the_PRS_v4.2.pdf

FAQs from buyers regarding COVID-19

Why can’t I complete if I’ve exchanged contracts?
Exchanging contracts normally means you have a date to move into your new property. The government guidance however is to delay your move if possible. Legal companies have been advised of how to do this so it’s done consistently

However it is still possible to complete, IF you can move your own belongings within the government guidance or don’t need to move into the property straightaway eg it’s for investment or a second home:-

Please note: If you are moving to a new home or one that is empty, ideally wait 72 hours after anyone has been in it. Keys need to be disinfected before they are passed over and ideally done remotely or by meeting the 2m distancing guidelines.

You should also check the up-to-date restrictions on movement before leaving your home.

What does a ‘delay’ actually mean?
It is possible to vary the contract. This allows your existing contracts to still be valid, but with a flexible date to complete. Your agent and legal company should check with your seller and others in the chain that they can still complete (see Will my mortgage still be valid?)

Will my mortgage still be valid?
As long as your circumstances haven’t changed, your mortgage offer should still be valid and could be extended by up to three months. Contact the mortgage lender/your broker to ask how delaying will affect your mortgage offer or ask your legal company to liaise. However if your job and earning status has changed, you will have to discuss this with your lender/broker to see if you can still go ahead, for example, if you have been furloughed or have lost your job or income has fallen due to the lock down.

For information on how to secure income during the lock down, visit: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-to-employers-and-businesses-about-covid-19

Can I insist we complete?
The government allows you ‘to move house where reasonably necessary’ during this time. So you can ask to complete, but bear in mind if someone has been asked to isolate for up to 12 weeks or has the virus, it can’t be done within the government’s guidelines. Other sellers and buyers circumstances may have changed through no fault of their own. So, please, be understanding and kind.

Who insures a property during exchange and completion?
It is the responsibility of the buyer to insure the property during exchange and completion, but the seller’s lender will also require the seller to maintain the insurance until the mortgage is repaid. Talk to your legal and insurance companies if you are unsure how to proceed and if it is your buyer insuring the property, make sure you have their details just in case you need them in an emergency. 

If the property is going to be empty for over 30 days you should check with the insurer whether it will still be covered or whether you will need specialist insurance.

What if my seller pulls out?
People always get nervous when there is uncertainty and these are extraordinary times. If you have exchanged and your seller pulls out for a valid reason eg they have lost their job, lost their own buyer, their mortgage offer on their next property has been pulled, then under normal contract terms a seller would still be entitled to damages, however, if you have varied the contract to defer completion because of Coronavirus, the clause will probably allow a seller to withdraw for these reasons without penalty.  Check with your property lawyer.

If they wish to pull out because they are nervous of what might happen to property prices or committing, then unless the normal contract terms have been changed, you are entitled to a percentage of the deposit.

Can I still exchange during lock down?
This will depend on whether a mortgage is required and if a valuation/survey has been done or not. If you are a cash buyer and/or you have a mortgage but the valuation/survey has already been done, you can exchange, but with a contract that will leave a date open to complete.

If the mortgage valuation has not been carried out but you and the lender are happy with a desktop valuation then you may be able to complete.

If my purchase is aborted, what costs will I incur?
If you have already exchanged, you may be able to claim the aborted costs from your buyer, depending on why they pulled out (see What if my seller pulls out?). If you haven’t exchanged you are likely to incur small costs such as those which are finance related, but speak to your lender/broker, under the circumstances they may wave any fees incurred. If your legal company was booked on a ‘no sale, no fee’ basis, they you will be charged any fees incurred on your behalf, but not the law firm’s charges for their legal work.  If your legal company is not on a ‘no sale, no fee’ basis then you will have to pay for their work to date.  This will vary depending on how long your transaction has been going and how much work they have done, so do check with them.  As with lenders/brokers, talk to your legal company, they may be lenient during this time.

Even if you are on a ‘no sale, no fee’ basis, this does not apply once contracts are exchanged.

Why are some removal companies saying they won’t move me?
Removal companies are in a tricky position. They are being told they can carry out work for ‘critical moves’ as long as they meet the government guidelines. However, they cannot meet the 2m social distancing and will clearly be constantly touching your items, which even if they wear gloves, won’t protect it. They will also be in your old and new home and likely to be in contact with you.

One of the main trade bodies for removal companies is the British Association of Removers. They have advised their members not to move people. If a company does agree to move you, please note they cannot do this within the government guidelines and you will be exposing yourself and your family to potential infection.

Do I need to clean a property before I move out or in?
Ideally yes, but this is something you need your legal company to agree with other parties. For example, confirm who is cleaning which property – should you clean the one you are leaving or clean the one you are moving too. Here are the government guidelines for cleaning a property: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-decontamination-in-non-healthcare-settings/covid-19-decontamination-in-non-healthcare-settings

 

FAQs from tenants regarding COVID-19

Can I move into a new rental property during lock down?
Only if it’s absolutely necessary. The government has asked tenants and landlords, where possible to “delay moving to a new house while measures are in place to fight coronavirus (COVID-19).”

Exceptions are if the property is empty (ideally for 72 hours) , the move is "essential" to avoid such things as homelessness or a risk to life or if there is a contractual reason to move. In these cases the government says you can ‘move house where reasonably necessary’.

Can I stop paying my rent?
Government guidance says:-
Tenants should continue to pay rent and abide by all other terms of their tenancy agreement to the best of their ability. The government has a strong package of financial support available to tenants, and where they can pay the rent as normal, they should do.

Tenants who are unable to do so should speak to their landlord at the earliest opportunity. In many if not most cases, the COVID-19 outbreak will not affect tenants’ ability to pay rent. If your ability to pay will be affected, it’s important to have an early conversation with your landlord. Rent levels agreed in your tenancy agreement remain legally due and you should discuss with your landlord if you are in difficulty.  Much funding has been made readily available by the government to help renters so it is worth checking whether you are receiving all the financial help available, these may include;

The Coronavirus Job Retention scheme

  1. The government have made applying for Universal Credit quicker and increased the amount of credit individuals will be eligible for please use this link for more information; https://www.gov.uk/apply-universal-credit or www.understandinguniversalcredit.gov.uk/coronavirus/
  2. Statutory Sick Pay – please use this link for more information; https://www.gov.uk/statutory-sick-pay
  3. If you are Self-Employed please use these links for more information; https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-a-grant-through-the-coronavirus-covid-19-self-employment-income-support-scheme  or https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-to-employers-and-businesses-about-covid-19/covid-19-support-for-businesses#support-for-businesses-through-the-coronavirus-business-interruption-loan-scheme

Government information on securing income support: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/support-for-those-affected-by-covid-19/support-for-those-affected-by-covid-19

Can I be evicted from my rental property if I’ve been affected by Coronavirus?
In England and Wales, tenants can still receive eviction notices for “secure, assured, assured shorthold, introductory and demoted tenancies and tenancies under the Rents Act 1977, thereby covering most tenants in the private and social rented sectors.” Source: https://gov.wales/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-for-tenants-in-the-private-rented-sector-html however, the landlord cannot apply for a court order for 90 days from 27th March 2020 and a court order is required to evict a tenant.

Can I be evicted if I am on a licence to occupy?
“This legislation….will not apply to licences to occupy (other than a secure licence under the Housing Act 1985). We are urging the landlords of those on licences to occupy to follow the same guidance and to work with renters who may be facing hardship as a result of the response to COVID-19”

Should property management visits/inspections take place during lockdown?
No, this is not classed as essential.  However many Agents are contacting Tenants to carry out “virtual” visits using videos or facetime style calls which is proving popular, helpful and informative for all parties.  Your Agent may well be in touch with you about this.

Do follow up Right to Rent Checks need to be carried out?

Follow up checks are still needed.  Temporary changes will mean the Home Office will not require landlords or agents to see original documents and will allow checks to be undertaken over video calls.  Proper, in person checks will need to be carried out after lockdown ends and within 8 weeks of that date for all those where video checks have occurred.

How do tenants meet government guidelines for the lock down in a shared house?
For those that are sharing a home, consider using the communal facilities individually, keeping your own plate/bowl and cutlery. Some tenants have organised a rota for use of the kitchen/bathroom and are advising the others via various apps that the kitchen etc is free.

 

What if other tenants are not abiding by the government guidance for social distancing?
There are reports of some tenants that are still having visitors to shared homes or going out socialising and taking little notice of the government lock down. Unfortunately your landlord can only issue a notice to evict, but can’t start court proceedings for 90 days from March 27th 2020 so it could take six months or more to evict the tenant.

As such, you need to come to some arrangement yourself, or advise your landlord and ask them to remind the tenant of their obligations, but unfortunately there is little the landlord can do.

What should a tenant do (particularly in a shared home) if they think they have the virus?
Basically follow the government guidance on self-isolation and it’s worth advising your landlord, remember they can’t evict you for 90 days from March 27th 2020 but neither does your landlord have to find alternative accommodation. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-stay-at-home-guidance and https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-stay-at-home-guidance/stay-at-home-guidance-for-households-with-possible-coronavirus-covid-19-infection

They explain: You should tell anyone you share the property with immediately, so that they can take appropriate action and make informed decisions regarding shared areas and access to the property. If your landlord needs to arrange a visit to the property for urgent health and safety reasons, you should also inform them and agree to take sensible precautions.

Should my landlord still be providing a cleaner?
Ideally no so they don’t go from one house to another. If you have had a cleaner, some landlords are providing tenants with cleaning products and if part of the contract, some are offering a reduction in rent to reflect the cost. Tenants are then using a rota system to keep things clean.

This is the government guidance on cleaning a property: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-decontamination-in-non-healthcare-settings/covid-19-decontamination-in-non-healthcare-settings

Does my landlord still need to carry out repairs on my home?
In short, yes, government guidance says repair obligations have not changed. Tenants have a right to a decent, warm and safe place to live – and it is in the best interests of both tenants and landlords to ensure that properties are kept in good repair and free from hazards.”  It is also advisable, where appropriate and safe for annual gas safety checks to be carried out.

As a tenant “You should inform your landlord early and engage constructively in the event that you encounter any issues with the condition of their property, and the effect of current restrictions should be considered.”

However, the government guidance states: “In these unprecedented times we encourage tenants and landlords to take a pragmatic, common-sense approach to non-urgent issues which are affected by COVID-19 related restrictions.”

What kind of repairs should a landlord still be carrying out?
According to the government “landlords’ repair obligations have not changed. Where reasonable, safe for you and in line with other Government guidance, we recommend that you allow local authorities, landlords or contractors access to your property in order to inspect or remedy urgent health and safety issues.”

They advise:

Urgent health and safety issues are those which will affect your ability to live safely and maintain your mental and physical health in your home. This could include (but is not limited to):

− If there is a problem with the fabric of your building, for example the roof is leaking
− If your boiler is broken, leaving you without heating or hot water
− If there is a plumbing issue, meaning you don’t have washing or toilet facilities
− If your white goods such as fridge or washing machine have broken, meaning you are unable to wash clothes or store food safely
− If there is a security-critical problem, such as a broken window or external door
− If equipment a disabled person relies on requires installation or repair

Further guidance on visits to properties to make repairs:  https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/further-businesses-and-premises-toclose/further-businesses-and-premises-to-close-guidance#work-carried-out-inpeoples-home

The government guidance also covers people who are property guardians and have accommodation along with their employment.

*The information on the website is for general information only and reflects the understanding at the date of publication. It does not constitute legal advice and should not be treated as such. It is provided without any representations or warranties, express or implied.